Teach the Beat!

Bringing the distinctive D.C. sound of go-go into the classroom.

Teaching for Change is honored to work with D.C.  area schools and the authors of The Beat! Go-Go Music from Washington, D.C. to develop lessons and share teaching ideas for infusing the history and music of go-go in middle and high school social studies, language arts, math, music, and/or D.C. history classes, and to bring renowned go-go performers into D.C. classrooms.

"Go-go has stayed true to time-honored cultural scripts such as live call-and-response, live instrumentation, as well as its locally rooted fashions, slang, dance, distribution and economic systems. Simply put: Go-Go never sold out. There is a grit and texture to the music that gives voice to the communities where it was created." –Natalie Hopkinson

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Go-Go Performers Coach Next Generation in D.C. Classrooms

OVERVIEW | ClASSROOM VISITS | HOSTING A VISITLESSONS |  SEMINARS

What an experience to see renowned go-go musicians coaching and mentoring students in D.C. classrooms. Students perform with expert guidance, ask questions, and wear out the performers with requests for photos and autographs before they leave. Meanwhile, the go-go performers share their talents with the younger generation and gain new-found respect for the dedication and hard work of classroom teachers.

The visits are part of a Teaching for Change Teach the Beat initiative in partnership with DC Public Schools called “Teach the Beat: Go-Go Goes to School: Artists and Scholars in the Classroom” designed to infuse D.C.’s rich and unique tradition of go-go in the curriculum. Go-go performers and scholars provide in-school coaching to D.C. public and public charter school teachers and students in music, social studies, and language arts classrooms.


Go-Go Classroom Visits

Here are the visits to date. We will continue to post photos and highlights after each visit.

2018 Visits

2017 Visits

2016 Visits

2015 Visits

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Website developed by Teaching for Change with support from
the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities.

Image credits: Thomas Sayers Ellis